Categorized under: Avery, news article

Brewery News – Avery plans to pull out of 8 states and 7 partial markets

#beer, @averybrewing,

Commentary:  This is sad news for Avery fans across America.  For those still close to  a state where Avery is distributed, it’s decided — you’ll just have to go on a road trip!! (Harold and Kumar should forget White Castle and seek out some Maharaja and Mephistopheles in their next movie.)

As an Avery fan, I understand that it is a hard decision for the whole Brewery, but I appreciate their decision to openly communicate this decision.  And I respect their decision to make sure that their  local Colorado market receives their well deserved attention. — Sean

Avery Brewing - Taps in a bar

Avery Brewing Co. Announces Plans To Exit 8 States and 7 Partial State Markets

Boulder, CO - Avery Brewing Company plans to withdraw from eight states and seven other partial-state markets beginning in April.  Faced with skyrocketing demand–first quarter 2011 production growth for their home state of Colorado is 81% and overall production growth is 75%–the brewery has been forced to make the tough decision or lose the ability to support all markets with a steady supply of fresh beer.

Beginning in April 2011 beer shipments will be ceased to Arizona, Connecticut, Indiana, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Rhode Island and Tennessee. Avery Brewing Company hopes to re-enter these eight states at some point in the future once production capacity can catch up with demand.  The brewery is also leaving several partial state markets, including: Northern California (Bay Area and Sacramento), Eastern Arkansas, Upstate New York (outside of New York City), Central Florida (Orlando area) and Wisconsin.

Avery Brewing Company would like to extend a sincere and heartfelt thank you to those who have supported us–and our beers–in these markets over the past years.  To our distributors and their hard working sales staff, to our retailers in on-premise and off-premise channels who have promoted our products with zeal and passion, and to our loyal customers and fans who have challenged their palates and enjoyed our beers over the years: thank you, thank you, thank you!!  Our apologies for any frustrations this change brings your way.

According to Avery Brewing President/Founder Adam Avery, “We all feel terrible about having to pull out of these markets.  No matter how you cut it, it is disappointing that we’ll no longer be able to serve our loyal fans in these areas. “ Ted Whitney, National Sales Director at Avery Brewing Company, added “This is certainly unfortunate, but it was done with the best intentions.  It’s about getting fresher beer and better experiences for our customers.”

Avery Brewery Logo

Avery Brewing Company is one of several craft breweries to announce such cuts in2011, but these disappointing changes are actually the sign of a very positive trend in the industry.   Exponential sales growth for craft brewers can only mean one thing: the craft beer movement is on fire, attracting more followers and gaining mindshare with people of all demographics across the country.   More fans means more market potential for all of the craft industry, and that’s a very good thing that will bring more great beer into the lives of Americans everywhere.  Here’s to American craft beer in 2011 and beyond!!

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Established in 1993, Avery Brewing Company has developed a reputation as being one of the most daring and visionary breweries in the nation.  They are the brewers of Avery IPA, The Maharaja Imperial IPA, White Rascal Belgian Wheat Ale, Mephistopheles’ Stout and eighteen other year-round and seasonal beers.  Please go to www.averybrewing.comfor more information on Avery beers.

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  • Anonymous

    I just read an interesting summary of this issue that the handful of Colorado breweries are facing, and it pointed to the fact that New Belgium seems to have figured out their supply and demand balance as they have not had to pull out of a market since 1996. I don’t know that any of these breweries could have planned for the explosion of growth they’ve seen, especially outside of their home market. Think about it this way… what other industry could possibly see such a grassroots boom in growth where essentially nothing is spent on advertising? Sure they’re running ads in trade magazines, but for the most part, they are completely relying on word of mouth and reputation. For them to be experiencing these growing pains is quite remarkable.

  • Angelo

    Heading off to an Avery IPA tasting at Belmont Station now. Glad they didn’t pull out of Oregon…

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